THE LAST SHOT - FUJIFILM Pack Film



My last FUJIFILM Instant "peel apart" Pack Film. I took my Polaroid Landcamera 355 to shoot my last pack film. I bought the film a couple of years ago for 10 EUR the current price, since discontinuation on Spring 2016 has climbed to over 50 EUR!  ... I don't think that I would use this camera any time soon ...



End of an Era

As you all know, “peel apart film” was the first instant film developed by Edwin Land back in 1947. 

In spring 2016 FujiFilm  Japan has announced that it is to stop production of its FP-100C instant film that enthusiasts use in old Polaroid-type cameras. The film has only been available in the 3.25x4.25in size recently, since the 5x4in version was discontinued, but it has been keeping vintage cameras clicking since Polaroid stopped production itself.


"Instant film is a type of photographic film introduced by Polaroid to be used in an instant camera (and, with accessory hardware, many other professional film cameras). The film contains the chemicals needed for developing and fixing the photograph, and the instant camera exposes and initiates the developing process after a photo has been taken. 

In 1947 Edward H. Land introduced the Polaroid-Land process. The first instant films produced sepia tone photos.[2] A negative sheet is exposed inside the camera, then lined up with a positive sheet and squeezed through a set of rollers which spread a reagent between the two layers, creating a developing film "sandwich". The negative develops quickly, after which some of the unexposed silver halide grains (and the latent image it contains) are solubilized by the reagent and transferred by diffusion from the negative to the positive. After a minute, depending on film type and ambient temperature, the negative is peeled away to reveal the picture which was transferred to the positive receiving sheet.


In Japan, Fujifilm introduced their own line of instant photographic products in 1981 starting with the Fotorama line of cameras. The name Fotorama came from photograph and panorama, as the film was a wide format compared to the square Polaroid SX-70/600 films.


Fujifilm's FP-100b45 was announced in Sept of 2009 for the US market.[13] The FP-3000b45 arrived in the North American market in Jan 2011, after Fujifilm Japan stopped manufacturing FP-100b, but was discontinued in 2012. In late 2012 Fujifilm discontinued FP-3000B,[15] followed by the discontinuation of FP-100C in spring 2016. "           ( source Wikipedia: Instant Film  )


THE LAST SHOT 



here are the first results ... 







due to a wrong ISO setting the first image was underexposed ... 






BLEACHING a FUJI FP-100C film*


There is a certain process  to obtain a usable negative (to scan) from 100C instant film. The process it is known under the name "BLEACHING" and it is based ( at least it is what I use ) in the use of Chlorine-based liquid bleach. If underexposed ( up left corner ) the bleached negative produces a better possive image! 


*NOTE:  THIS IS NOT THE PROCESS FOR 3000B NEGATIVES.  IF YOU APPLY THIS PROCESS TO A 3000B NEGATIVE YOU COULD DESTROY IT ... 


And finally, here's a comparison of what bleaching can do.  The image on the right is the print.  The one on the left is the bleached negative.  


If underexposed ( up left corner ) the bleached negative produces a better possive image! 





due to incompleate Bleaching there are white areas in the negative ... I have to repeat the process more carefully ... 










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